Scholarships

Motu currently funds two scholarships:

  • the Motu Thesis Scholarship for students of Māori descent, and
  • the Motu Doctoral Scholarship.

The Motu Research and Education Foundation also offers a cash prize for the top economics undergraduate student in New Zealand. The Frank Holmes Prize is awarded every year in October and is only available by nomination by university heads of department. 

Motu Thesis Scholarship

Applications for the 2017 Motu Thesis Scholarship are now closed. 

Every year, Motu offers a one-year scholarship to a promising university student of Māori descent planning to work on an Honours, Masters or PhD thesis on an applied topic preferably in economics, or some other social science, and preferably using a quantitative methodology. The value of the scholarship is $10,000. 

Through this scholarship, we hope to enhance Māori research capacity and encourage students of Māori descent to develop an interest in researching topics relevant to public policy development. Applications for the 2018 Scholarship will open in late 2017. 

Past recipient: Hautahi Kingi

The 2016 recipient was Hautahi Kingi (Nga Rauru, Te Atihaunui a Paparangi) a PhD candidate in economics at Cornell University in the United States. Mr Kingi has two elements to his research, one around immigration and the other looking into tax and consumption. You can read more about Hautahi here.

Motu Doctoral Scholarship

The Motu Doctoral Scholarship can be awarded to Motu Research Analysts who have been employed by Motu for at least twelve months and who leave to undertake a highly rated PhD course.

The objectives are to:

  • recognise the recipient’s outstanding contribution while employed at Motu, and
  • encourage the recipient to gain the qualifications needed to become an independent researcher, and thus continue to build New Zealand’s research capacity.

Previous recipients

Previous recipients of the Motu Doctoral Scholarship are Isabelle Sin (Stanford), Melanie Morton (Yale), Andrew Aitken (University College London), Simon Anastasiadis (Stanford), Alex Olssen (MIT) and Athene Laws (Cambridge).